Day 1 of Raid Games in Orlando. Some of us fooling around and Wod 1.

2 notes

pmon3y69:

drdawg:

my friend Pete literally makes me cry with his snap stories

this is me, i am pete, love me 

177,586 notes

sarah-squats asked: Maybe I am completely wrong, but I think I remember you posting about doing the water tank body fat % test??? If you did do it, did you find it accurate/what are your thoughts on it?

actionsexpresspriority:

namastebandar:

Hey!
No I’ve never done that actually. My gym does have a bf% scale, although I stayed away from the scale for a really long time and will be going on it for the first time in MONTHS soon.
I’ve heard it’s the most accurate way to get numbers.
I hope it’s ok that I publish this because I’m sure there is somebody who has done it/knows more about it than me.
Thoughts?

I’ve had it done 2 times and I feel like is accurate. They say it’s the most accurate. The company that did mine also provided a complete print out showing my metabolic rate, calories burned for certain activities, and a lot of other info. Cost was $25 (I think) for the service. I felt like it was worth it. Feel free to message me if you want more info. I can send you a copy of the report or something.

Where do you get it done at?

8 notes

snapchatting:

God liked Saturn so he put a ring on it. :) haha only Christian astronauts will get this one!

Or ppl who know the song….

(Source: snapchatting)

42,646 notes

mscobralaserface:

optimus-primette:

I get such positive feedback from personal posts. I’m just afraid if I make a personal post often, so many people will be like OMFG STFU THERE GOES MEGAN CRYING AGAIN ATTENTION WHORE which is why I never talked about it in the first place.

Wow, really?  I really like your personal posts.  I actually prefer blogs that post personal stuff although you do have some quality reblogs.

I agree.

17 notes

jenazambrello:


Solid selfie of me and my horse.

jenazambrello:

Solid selfie of me and my horse.

2,911 notes

halfguardaroundtheworld:

nightwiiing:

archiemcphee:

LEGO + The Lord of the Rings = Awesome

Alice Finch (creator of the LEGO Hogwarts featured here) teamed up with David Frank to create a LEGO model of Rivendell:

“the last homely house west of the mountains,” where Elrond where Elrond hosts both Bilbo and his dwarven companions in The Hobbit and Frodo and the Fellowship in The Lord of the Rings.

The Brothers Brick just unveiled official photos of this jaw-droppingly detailed model, which was made suing 200,000 LEGO bricks. They also interviewed Alice and David about their stupendous creation.

A project of this scale begins with plenty of research. In order to faithfully recreate one of Middle-Earth’s loveliest locations using tiny plastic bricks, Alice and David first studied all the relevant scenes from The Fellowship of the Ring and then painstakingly scoured BrickLink in search of custom LEGO pieces that would best suit their ambitious goal.

Visit The Brothers Brick to learn more about all of the work that went into creating this beautiful plastic love letter to the work of J.R.R. Tolkien.

Visit Alice Finch’s Flickr stream for a complete gallery of photos.

[via The Brothers Brick]

WOWWWWWWW

neeeeeeeeeeeeEEEEEEEEEEEEEEED

1,636 notes

basedgosh:

"am i horny or am i just trying to capitalize on this time to masturbate" a question i should ask myself more often

1,410 notes

So I took a makeup version of the exam I failed.

A ton harder, didn’t study at all, just made sure I got some sleep cause I thought that is what messed me up. Got a B. Awesome

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pennyfornasa:

Astronomers Find First Earth-Sized Planet That Could Support Life!
NASA’s Kepler Space Telescope has discovered the first Earth-sized planet in the habitable zone of another star. The habitable zone is the region around a star in which planets are capable of supporting liquid water at their surface. This region is sometimes referred to as the Goldilocks zone because it defines the area where the conditions are not too hot or too cold, but “just right” for planets to support water on the surface. The discovery Kepler-186f confirms that planets of Earth’s size exist in the habitable zone of stars other than our Sun. It also marks a significant step forward in finding other planets similar to our own.
Read more about the exciting discovery of Kepler-186f here: http://www.nasa.gov/ames/kepler/nasas-kepler-discovers-first-earth-size-planet-in-the-habitable-zone-of-another-star/index.html#.U1BDx6ZLtFt

pennyfornasa:

Astronomers Find First Earth-Sized Planet That Could Support Life!

NASA’s Kepler Space Telescope has discovered the first Earth-sized planet in the habitable zone of another star. The habitable zone is the region around a star in which planets are capable of supporting liquid water at their surface. This region is sometimes referred to as the Goldilocks zone because it defines the area where the conditions are not too hot or too cold, but “just right” for planets to support water on the surface. The discovery Kepler-186f confirms that planets of Earth’s size exist in the habitable zone of stars other than our Sun. It also marks a significant step forward in finding other planets similar to our own.

Read more about the exciting discovery of Kepler-186f here: http://www.nasa.gov/ames/kepler/nasas-kepler-discovers-first-earth-size-planet-in-the-habitable-zone-of-another-star/index.html#.U1BDx6ZLtFt

1,575 notes

distant-traveller:

A Milky Way dawn

As dawn broke on March 27, the center of the Milky Way Galaxy stood almost directly above the European Southern Observatory’s Paranal Observatory. In the dry, clear sky of Chile’s Atacama desert, our galaxy’s dusty central bulge is flanked by Paranal’s four 8 meter Very Large Telescope units in this astronomical fisheye view. Along the top, Venus is close to the eastern horizon. The brilliant morning star shines very near a waning crescent Moon just at the edge of one of the telescope structures. Despite the bright pairing in the east, the Milky Way dominates the scene though. Cut by dust lanes and charged with clouds of stars and glowing nebulae, the center of our galaxy sprawls across the darker zenith even as the deep blue sky grows brighter and buildings still glint in moonlight.

Image credit & copyright: Babak Tafreshi (TWAN), ESO Ultra HD Expedition

distant-traveller:

A Milky Way dawn

As dawn broke on March 27, the center of the Milky Way Galaxy stood almost directly above the European Southern Observatory’s Paranal Observatory. In the dry, clear sky of Chile’s Atacama desert, our galaxy’s dusty central bulge is flanked by Paranal’s four 8 meter Very Large Telescope units in this astronomical fisheye view. Along the top, Venus is close to the eastern horizon. The brilliant morning star shines very near a waning crescent Moon just at the edge of one of the telescope structures. Despite the bright pairing in the east, the Milky Way dominates the scene though. Cut by dust lanes and charged with clouds of stars and glowing nebulae, the center of our galaxy sprawls across the darker zenith even as the deep blue sky grows brighter and buildings still glint in moonlight.

Image credit & copyright: Babak Tafreshi (TWAN), ESO Ultra HD Expedition

(Source: apod.nasa.gov)

294 notes